Wednesday, February 5, 2020

Flash Flood Watch Issued for Smoky Mountains Region

If you're in the Smokies, or planning to visit over the next few days, please be aware of the following bulletins from the National Weather Service. Also keep in mind that streams throughout the park will be well above average flows for the next several days. In additions to the flash flood warnings, the National Weather Service is also warning about the possibility of tornadoes tomorrow, and snow on Friday:
Heavy rainfall with potential for flooding tonight through Thursday evening...

.A slow-moving frontal system will bring periods of heavy rain through Thursday. Today`s rainfall has created favorable conditions for flash flooding with another round of showers and thunderstorms tonight and Thursday. Heavy showers and thunderstorms that repeatedly track over the same areas could result in flash flooding of creeks and streams tonight and Thursday.

...FLASH FLOOD WATCH NOW IN EFFECT THROUGH LATE THURSDAY NIGHT...

The Flash Flood Watch is now in effect for

* Portions of southwest North Carolina, east Tennessee, and southwest Virginia, including the following areas, in southwest North Carolina, Cherokee and Clay. In east Tennessee, Anderson, Bledsoe, Blount Smoky Mountains, Bradley, Campbell, Claiborne, Cocke Smoky Mountains, East Polk, Grainger, Hamblen, Hamilton, Hancock, Hawkins, Jefferson, Johnson, Knox, Loudon, Marion, McMinn, Meigs, Morgan, North Sevier, Northwest Blount, Northwest Carter, Northwest Cocke, Northwest Greene, Northwest Monroe, Rhea, Roane, Scott, Sequatchie, Sevier Smoky Mountains, Southeast Carter, Southeast Greene, Southeast Monroe, Sullivan, Unicoi, Union, Washington, and West Polk. In southwest Virginia, Lee, Russell, Scott, Washington, and Wise.

* Through late Thursday night

* Rainfall amounts of 2 to 4 inches are expected with isolated higher amounts.

* Heavy rain with showers and thunderstorms could cause flash flooding. People in the watch area should be aware of the possibility of rapidly rising creeks and streams. Avoid low lying areas...and be careful when approaching highway dips and underpasses. Never attempt to drive across a flooded road.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Flash Flood Watch means that conditions may develop that lead to flash flooding. Flash flooding is a very dangerous situation.

You should monitor later forecasts and be prepared to take quick action if flooding is observed or a Flash Flood Warning is issued. If you come to a closed or flooded road...turn around! Don`t drown!

This Hazardous Weather Outlook is for portions of southwest North Carolina...east Tennessee and southwest Virginia.

.DAY ONE...This Afternoon and Tonight

Periods of heavy rain are expected through Thursday. Today`s rainfall will create favorable conditions for flash flooding with another round of heavy rain tonight through Thursday morning. Showers and thunderstorms that repeatedly track over the same areas could result in flash flooding of creeks and streams tonight and Thursday. Rainfall totals of 2 to 5 inches are expected across the area with locally higher amounts possible. Isolated strong to severe storms with damaging wind gusts the primary threat later this evening and overnight into Thursday morning. A few tornadoes could occur as well.

.DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN...Thursday through Tuesday

The potential for heavy rain and flooding will continue through Thursday evening. Isolated strong to severe storms may affect southeast Tennessee mountains and southwest North Carolina early Thursday morning.

Thursday night rain will change to snow across the higher elevations. The eastern TN mountains could see 1 to 2 inches of snow by Friday afternoon above 3500 feet.

.SPOTTER INFORMATION STATEMENT...

Spotter activation may be needed tonight.




Jeff
HikingintheSmokys.com
RockyMountainHikingTrails.com
HikinginGlacier.com
TetonHikingTrails.com

Ramble On: A History of Hiking
Exploring Grand Teton National Park

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